Make your own reusable sanding block

Woodworking Tips

Here will teach you how to make your own reusable sanding module. Cut from three quarters to six blocks. You usually use plywood for each sandpaper sand. Make them 2 – 1/2. X 4-3 / 4. Spray glue on each piece of a square cork bricks. Paste a piece of cork, cork flush with a tool knife. Then sprayed in a sandpaper, attached to each piece of cork, as shown. Place the sandpaper with plenty of cork and label each piece.

Important table saw safety

Important table saw safety

When you cut the table saw, cut a piece of clamping length set to the fence. Never use a fence directly to avoid a board kick back in your right. Instead, clip a piece of wood in front of the fence. Then the end of the board will be fence during and after the freedom. If you put a piece is 1. Thick, you can set the fence size to 1. The length is greater than after you. Involving any tricky score.

Use stair gauges as a crosscut guide

Use stair gauges as a crosscut guide

Stair gauges are usually used to lay out stair jacks. You clamp them to a carpenter’s square to match the rise and run of a stair jack and then mark the notches. But if you put them both on the same tongue of a carpenter’s square, the combination makes a great crosscut guide for circular saws.

Use tape to catch excess glue

Use tape to catch excess glue

To prevent stains caused by oozing glue along joints, clamp the pieces together without glue. Put tape on the joint, then cut along it with a sharp blade. Separate the pieces, apply the glue and clamp them together again. The glue will ooze onto the tape, not the wood. Peel off the tape before the glue dries.

Use a drafting square for more accuracy

Use a drafting square for more accuracy

When you need an accurate square in the 2- to 3-ft. range, your options are limited. Drywall squares are notoriously inaccurate and cumbersome. Carpenter squares involve that nagging hassle of having to hook them onto the edge of your workpiece. If you have a drafting square lying around, drag it out to the shop. Or, go to an art supply store and pick one up ($5 or more). They’re very accurate and you’ll find yourself grabbing it nearly as often as you do the tape measure.

Hot glue holds small stuff better than clamps

Hot glue holds small stuff better than clamps

When you have to cut, shape, file, sand or finish something small, reach for your hot glue gun and glue the piece to a pedestal stick. The hot glue will hold just about anything as well as or better than any clamp ever could—if using a clamp is even possible. When your project is complete, try to pop it loose with a putty knife, but don’t use too much force—you might tear out the wood or break the piece.

Use duct tape to mark a level spot

Use duct tape to mark a level spot

You’ve finally got your table saw on a mobile base so it’s easy to pull out and put away on the weekend. Finish the job by finding a level spot on the floor that’s also convenient for sawing boards without obstruction. Mark the wheel positions with bright-colored duct tape and now you can roll the saw to the same flat spot every time you saw.

Install blade so teeth face forward

Install blade so teeth face forward

Install the blade hacksaw so the teeth are on the surface. The saw blades will be designed to cut when pushed rather than pulled. Some of the blade arrows show the correct installation (arrow pointing to handle). Install the blade to see tight and will not bend. When you do a lot of reduction, the blade will heat and expand, so be sure to strengthen it if it starts to bend.